My top 8 unforgettable moments in India Golden Temple- More than guys with turbans and a temple covered with shiny gold Kumbh Mela 2013 – where chaos meets peace Personal experience of visiting the Taj Mahal Arriving at Delhi’s Indira Gandhi International Airport

My top 8 unforgettable moments in India

Manuela, my friend from Colombia describes some of her best moments of her stay in India. Those who don’t remember who Manuela is, well she’s a girl from Colombia who decided that she wanted to live in India. You can read about her arrival here and about her adventures in Chandigarh. By Manuela Last Tuesday, […]

Golden Temple- More than guys with turbans and a temple covered with shiny gold

My friend Manuela shares her experience of her visit to the Golden Temple Amritsar (also known as Swarn Mandir) in the Punjab. Golden Temple: More than guys with turbans and a temple covered with shiny gold By Manuela Osorio Pineda I’ve always considered myself as an ‘off-the-beat-traveler’ who craves visiting the remote little spots of a […]

Kumbh Mela 2013 – where chaos meets peace

This is a story of my friend Rishabh Oberoi who went to the Kumb Mela this year. This is the part 1 of his visit to the Kumbh Mela in Allahabad. Part 1: The World Largest Religious Gathering of People on the Bed of Sangam I believe Indian culture is the most colorful and diverse culture […]

Personal experience of visiting the Taj Mahal

My friend Natalia from Brazil was recently in India where she happened to visit the Taj Mahal along with other places in India. She sent me her account of her visit along with some of her photos that she took on her visit. This is the personal account of her visit to the glorious Taj […]

Arriving at Delhi’s Indira Gandhi International Airport

Indira Gandhi International Airport in Delhi will perhaps be the entry point for most foreign travellers to India. I have always wondered why this airport was not named after Mahatma Gandhi since he is considered as the father of the nation. Anyway, from a personal point of view, this is the worst International airport I […]

Drinking water guide in India

One of the first concerns while travelling in India is where to get water from. Drinking water fountains are a rare sight and even when where there is one, an issue of quality crops up in the mind of a tourist. The golden rule is not to drink tap water. The safest bet therefore is to go for bottled water, but is it?

There are currently half-a-dozen major bottle water brands in India. The most popular are Bisleri, kinley and Aquafina. Of these, Bisleri has a longest presence in India. It’s an Italian company which came to India back in the 1960s. It’s a big player in the bottle water industry. There are smaller players too that claim to have very high standards. But that’s only a part of the story. Read More…

Nomadic Samuel shares his experiences of India

I am thrilled to interview Samuel Jeffery. He’s a Canadian expat English teacher, model, photographer, freelance writer and not to mention a wandering nomadic soul. He has spent most of his 20´s as a wandering nomad. A few years back, he was in India and he has been kind enough to share his Indian experiences.

Interview with Nomadic Samuel

When did you visit India?

I was fortunate enough to have visited India back in 2010 from late October until mid December. Overall, I was there for seven weeks.

Which parts of India did you see?

I visited quite a few destinations in Rajasthan including Jaipur, Pushkar, Johdpur, Udaipur and Jaisalmer. I then backtracked to Delhi where I headed up north to Mcleod Ganj and Amritsar. After another quick pit-stop in Delhi I visited the Taj Mahal in Agra. My last two destinations were Varanasi and Kolkata before travelling overland to Bangladesh.

Blue Homes Jodhpur India

Blue Homes Jodhpur India

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Pangong Tso Lake

Pangong Tso: Lake that extends from Ladakh (India) to Tibet

Pangong Tso: Lake that extends from Ladakh (India) to Tibet

Pangong Tso is a lake of breathtaking beauty in Ladakh, lying just about 160 km from Leh. A nearly 5 hour drive from Leh is a wonderful journey in itself, which first passes through huge monasteries and then a vast expanse of endless mountain range and finally cuts through the Changla Pass- the third highest pass in the world which has access to motor vehicles.

About Pangong Tso Lake

Pagong Tso means long, narrow, enchanted lake in the Tibetan language. It is situated at the height of about 4,350m, and measures nearly 134 km in length, though, at its widest it is just 5 km. Despite the fact that the lake is full of brackish water, it freezes to a depth of several meters in winter season. The lake changes in color during the day, appearing deepest hues of blue when the sun is high, a turquoise shade near the bank and deeper hues in the middle of the lake. It loses its shades and turns dull as the day progresses with the sun moves towards the horizon. Read More…

Interview with traveller Kathryn Burrington

Kathryn Burrington is a professional travel writer, graphic designer and photographer in the travel industry for over 15 years. I have been following Kathryn on her blog and I have found it very entertaining and have learnt lots of things from around the world. She has been kind enough to share some of her experiences of her travels in India. I was impressed that she brought a sari from India as a souvenir. Equally impressive is that she has a print of a Raja Ravi Varma painting on her wall.

Kathryn Burrington of TravelWithKat

Kathryn Burrington of TravelWithKat


Here’s Kathryn’s interview

When did you visit India and which parts of India did you see?

I’ve been to India twice. Firstly in 2004, when I spent an unforgettable three weeks exploring Rajasthan. The intention was that this would be a one-off, trip of a lifetime. We stayed in some amazingly luxurious and historic hotels and some rather quirky hotels, including one built out of camel dung. It was all organised by a good friend of mine, who has spent many years travelling around India.

I enjoyed it so much that, when I was invited again the following year to Tamil Nadu and Kerala, I couldn’t resist. Our visit was planned for what turned out to be just a few weeks after the dreadful Boxing Day Tsunami. The first two hotels we were staying in were flooded but they were up and running again in plenty of time for our visit. Sadly, a couple of people pulled out worrying that it might not be a good idea to go just then. Most of us, however, felt it was even more important to go and support the area’s tourist industry, spending our money in the local shops and restaurants and so on. The local fishermen, for example, had lost their boats and so took it in turns to sell seashells on the beach outside one of the hotels. I was more than happy to buy some. Read More…

How to book train tickets in India?

The Indian Railways constitute one of the largest rail networks in the world. The first passenger train in India left Mumbai (then Bombay) on 16 April, 1853 for Pune. The rail network in the country has come a long way since. Currently it employs over one-and-a-half million people, links 28 states and three union territories, operates over 6,000 locomotives running on more than 60,000 km long tracks spread across the country and ferrying over 10 billion people (more than the planet’s population) every year. This gigantic network offers an unmatched variety of trains – from notoriously crowded trains whose photos you often see on the web to cruise trains that offer an unrivalled luxury – and unique way to discover India.

Indian railways

Indian railways

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Meaning of Namaste

Namaste is a popular greeting in India, Nepal and countries where Hindu population are in large numbers. Like Arabic ‘Salam Aleikum’ or Spanish ‘Adios’, ‘Namaste’ crosses the boundaries of language and region. Irrespective of your location inside India or Nepal, people will know your intentions are not bad if you join your hands and greet them by saying ‘Namaste‘.

Indian Sadhu performing Namaste

Indian Sadhu performing Namaste

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Try the delicious motichoor ladoo

Who can resist the temptation of sweets? When it comes to Indian sweets, it’s even harder. Indian sweets are not just sweets or desserts but a way of life and ingrained heavily in the culture of India. Amongst the various types of Indian sweets, the round shaped “Ladoo” is extremely popular in India. So much that even Lord Ganesha, the Indian elephant god is seen holding a ladoo in his hand. In fact, his favourite food is none other than the ladoo. There is no other way to please Lord Ganesh than offering him ladoos. 

A typical sweet shop in India

A typical sweet shop in India. Source: amee@work’s photostream on Flickr

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Types of ghosts and haunted places in India

Types of ghosts and haunted places in India

If you happen to be one of those people who are believers of the paranormal then why not come to India to explore some of the haunted places India has to offer. India is a nation of believer of gods, demi-gods and at the same breath they are quick to accept that ghosts (called bhoot in Hindi), demons, witches, the possessed and the un-dead exist side by side. Before I tell you some of the most haunted places, here are some of the types of ghosts Indians believe in and you’ll expect to find. They are different to the ones found in the West such goblins, monsters, demons or zombies.

1920 Evil Returns

1920 Evil Returns

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Interview with traveller Daniel McBane

I have been reading Daniel McBane’s travel blog and I have found it very entertaining and funny. He is one of those great travellers who has been travelling all over the world and supporting himself along the way. He’s also a hobbyist photographer, an English teacher and a blogger.

Daniel in Goa

Daniel in Goa

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Complete guide to Mysore city

Complete guide to Mysore city

Mysore, locally known as Mysuru was the prominent city of Karnataka prior to Bangalore. This mystical and mythological city derives its name from the buffalo headed demon Mahishasur who is known to have been slain atop the Chamundi Hills by Goddess Chamundeshwari, an avatar of Parvati. The 10 day dussehra festival is organized every year to celebrate this victory of the good over the evil. The city can boast of its rich past given to it generously by the dynasty of the Wodeyars, which has created such an appealing charm about the city that it can enthrall tourists even to this day. Read More…

Culture of India

Culture of India is a complex phenomenon. In its broadest sense, it includes everything a society does. It can also be limited to a particular social class (working class culture) or genre (literature, music). Still it’s always near to impossible to define what exactly a popular culture constitutes. Contrary to what may appear from outside; to Indians, there is no such thing as Indian culture in sense of a uniform manner of doing something. There is little common between the Punjabi culture with its emphasis on having fun and the Bengali culture with its emphasis on intellectualism. In the south, a person from Kerala finds the food from Andhra too spicy for their tongue. The seven states in the northeast are home to thousands of tribes and regions, each boasting of a rich history and unique culture. So the term ‘culture of India‘ has little meaning, unless it’s used an amalgamation of a score of different cultures within the country. Nonetheless, it is thought that the culture of India stems from its ancient history from the amalgamation of the Aryan nomads that migrated from the Central Asia through Afghanistan and settled in India with the natives of the valley of the Indus River of Dravidian descent.

Naga Sadhu Culture of India

Naga Sadhu: India's holy men

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