The Qutub Minar


Located in the south of Delhi, this magnificent red sandstone building called Qutub Minar (Qutb Minar) is still the tallest tower in India, more than 800 years after its foundations were laid by Qutab-ud-din Aibak, the first Muslim ruler to successfully establish an Islamic dynasty in India. It’s widely believed Qutab-ud-din issued orders to build this historic monument after defeating the Rajputs. Though the original tower was built as early as 1202 AD, it would be Qutab-ud-din’s successors who would add more storeys to it, make it taller and still more impressive. This splendid piece of architecture is the most popular tourist spot in India, attracting millions of tourists each year.

UNESCO has declared the building a World Heritage Site and currently the Archaeological Survey of India oversees the building.

Qutub-ud-din Aibak was born in Afghanistan. He was well educated and proficient in several forms of battle. He was sold as a slave to another Afghan warlord Mohammed Ghauri. He soon proved his skills and after his master’s death took over his possessions. He came to India, fought the Rajputs, defeated them, conquered Delhi and to symbolise this victory, ordered the construction of a mosque and a minar (Minaret) with red sandstone exploited from destroyed Hindu temples.

"Qutub Minar"

The Qutub Minar

Construction of Qutub Minar

How the Qutb Minar was constructed during a period of several centuries makes for a fascinating history. Sikandar Lodi will make the last big changes in the tower, making it bigger and taller, in 1503, some 400 years after Qutub-ud-din Aibak began its construction in 1202 AD. The original tower was only one storey tall. The later rulers added more storeys and enlarged the inner chambers. Muhammad-bin-Tughluq and Firuz Shah Tughluq did important restoration work after the tower was damaged twice in lighting in the 14th century. A few decades later, Sikandar Lodi added more storeys to the tower, giving it its current shape.

"Qutub Minar"

Architecture of  Qutub Minar

Qutub Minar is 14.32 metres in diameter at its base and 72.5 metres in height. It has five storeys and each floor is separated from the one below it and the one above it by a series of elaborately decorated balconies. Each of the first three storeys is tells about the architecture in vogue at the time. There were originally seven storeys. A copula that made the top two fell in an earthquake. The Mughals tried to replace it. The new copula didn’t chime in well with the rest of the building so it was removed.

Qutub Minar is not a standalone construction. It’s an amalgamation of several buildings in the vicinity of one another. The important buildings surrounding this tower include: Alai-Darwaza, Tomb of Iltutmish and two mosques. The Darawaza (Gate) is a quintessential example of Indo-Islamic architecture which flourished after this period on the Subcontinent. The architecture of the mosque is idiosyncratic in several ways. The most visible are the columns inside the mosque; of which none resembles the other. This was in stark contrast to other mosques in other parts of the world, where uniformity was highly priced. The archaeologists’ explanation is that the new ruler was in a hurry therefore he used stones seized from the temples intact. Sanskrit inscription on the columns are still visible.

The History of Qutub Minar

More than 800-years old, the Qutub Minar (Qutb Minar) is one tallest minarets in the world. It was constructed after Qutub-ud-din Aibak founded the first Muslim dynasty in India after defeating Hindu Rajput kings in the Delhi region. Mainstream archaeologists believe the tower is named after the victorious Sultan Qutbuddin Aibak. Other contend it’s named after Khwaja Qutb-ud-din Bakhtiar Kaki, a venerable saint from Baghdad.

"Qutb Minar"

Founder of Qutub Minar

Qutub-ud-din Aibak was born to parents of Turkic descent in present day Afghanistan. As a child, he learnt archery, Arabic, Persian and other skills. This made those around him jealous. So he was told to an Afghan warlord Mohammed Ghauri. Aibak used this intelligence and skills to get closer to Ghauri. By time of Ghauri’s death, they were so close it was to him that Ghauri’s possessions fell. Aibak was an excellent general himself. He soon used his shrewdness and cunning to expand the tiny territory he had been bequeathed to a vast empire comprising of much of north India, Pakistan and Afghanistan.

Foundation

During Aibak’s time Delhi was a federation of seven cities ruled by seven Rajput rulers. Among them Anang Pal’s Lalkot was a very important one. So when Aibak conquered Lalkot, he decided to leave an indelible mark of his achievement and started the construction of the Qutub Minar right in the heart of the city. He also began the construction of the first mosque on Indian soil. He was so desperate to build them as fast as he could, he ordered more than two dozen Hindu temples to be razed to ground and their stone be used in the construction of the Minar and the mosque.

Later Construction

"Qutb Minar Minaret"

The walls of the Qutb Minar Minaret

Aibak died shortly after the construction work began on the Qutub Minar. So it was his successor, also a former slave, Muhammad bin Sam who completed the building. When the Minar was damaged by lighting in 1326, the the ruler Muhammad-bin-Tughluq restored the building. When the lighting struck again in 1368, the contemporary ruler Firuz Shah Tughluq not only did the restoration work, but also added three storeys to the structure. The next major enlargement of the tower was done in 1503 when Sikandar Lodi added two more storeys in the form of a copula, making the tower a seven-storey construction. The copula was destroyed during an earthquake during the Mughal times. The Mughals tried to replace it. The new copula was so incongruous with the whole structure that they had to abandon their plans. Since then, the 72.5 metre Qutub Minar has only five storeys.

Current situation of Qutub Minar

Even after more than eight centuries since its foundation was laid, the Qutub Minar stands erect as the tallest brick tower on the planet. The tower, along with other historic buildings in its vicinity is a World Heritage Site. The Archaeological Survey of India looks after the preservation work. Despite being old and a few kilometres from the centre of the city, this red sandstone construction is the most popular tourist destination in India. According to some estimates, it alone attracts more than a million tourists each year.

"Qutab Minar"

The Qutab Minar

Qutub Minar Timings

Open from 6am to 6pm every day.

Address: Mehrauli, Delhi-Gurgaon Road

Admission fees: Indians Rupees 10, Foreigners Rupees 250, Children 15 and under free

Video Filming Fee: Rupees 25 (Non-commercial)

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49 Responses to “The Qutub Minar”

  1. BJ says:

    It’s awe-inspiring when you see a structure of such age that is still so solid. It makes your mind race when you try and imagine how it was originally constructed, doesn’t it?

  2. Bryan says:

    Hello shalu
    very informative post and good images Shalu, 800 year old brick tower,well preserved , thanks for sharing this article on Qutub Minar and its history
    Bryan

  3. Rachel Cook says:

    Hi Shalu! Nice to meet you! :)! As far I know India is one of the most historical continents. I’ve read about ‘Qutub Minar’ before but this content is more informative. Thanks for make me more acknowledged about the structure.
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  4. Bhavesh says:

    this article is really great. happy to know history of qutub minar. thanxx for sharing such a great post about qutub minar….!!!!

  5. Hi Shalu……
    I am loving your blog…..
    I am getting following benefit from your blog

    1- I am knowing more about my country’s historic monuments.
    2- Improving my History and Geography.
    3- I can plan where I should go in my next holiday trip….

    Thanks for sharing lots of information and beautiful snaps of Qutub Minar
    Twitter:

  6. Great website Shalu. I could know India at its best through this website. I don’t have much information about Patna and its historical places. Please make some post on patna, Bihar.

  7. Hi Shalu,
    It is amazing how this tower was preserved. I never knew you can even build a brick tower that is so tall. India doesn’t cease to amaze me.

  8. Siju George says:

    Wow, too much information about Qutub Minar. So we can say it is a total work of different emperors in different time period.

  9. Ehsan says:

    Hey Shau, Thanks for sharing the history of Qutub Minar. I have heard about this Minar many times and I’ve also read about this in books.
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  10. Hi, Shalu this is great post on Qutub Minar, I have been there once with my Indian friend, but there were some crypt text written on the iron pillar which no one could understand, can you post some pictures of that. I will be visiting your site again.
    Thanks
    Nancy.

  11. Shalu, I must confess that I had never heard of Qutub Minar and feel a little sheepish to be so ignorant of such an interesting historical building. The Leaning Tower of Pisa is of course famous, and it doesn’t even stand up straight! Your writing is excellent by the way. I just compared the Wikipedia article, and yours is easier to read. While I was there I noticed that the Iron Pillar is in the Qtub Minar courtyard — THAT I had heard of for its amazing resistance to rust.

    • Shalu says:

      Hello Cory, this monument is very popular in Delhi built by Muslim rulers in response to their win over Hindus. Architecturally its a marvel and a must visit when in Delhi.
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  12. Prasad Np says:

    Indeed Qutub Minar is the most iconic structure in Delhi and a must visit for anybody coming to Delhi. I was there recently and it is really awesome to look in person. A very informative post.
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  13. arefin sid says:

    I have heard about Minar before.Surprised to hear it is one tallest minarets in the world.Will visit India soon surely visit “kutub minar”

  14. wisatania says:

    Woww I love your travel info at this blog. Especially for Kutub Minar. I want to write about India and will use information from your blog, Shalu. Do you mind?

  15. annasaamir74 says:

    you and your posts are amazing Qutub Minar is most of the best places in India and INDAI IS ALSO IS A GOOD AND BEAUTIFUL PLACE

  16. Rawat says:

    Hi shallu Mam, you have been always inspirations for me to become a writer. I love all your blogs and articles. Special local tourist places. Please write some thing about Kolkata stree food.

  17. Aleah says:

    Good to know about the background of Qutub Minar. When I was in Delhi, I went there but I didn’t go inside. Too bad.
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  18. Qutub Minar is a beautiful and historical place of of india. It has very high. Tourists are like to go Qutub Minar. I thankful for you share very nice article.

  19. Prince says:

    hiii Shalu mam
    Thanks for giving such great detsiled information about qutub minar

  20. Ankit from Clash of Clans says:

    Superb view. Qutub minar is visible from my home as I live in capital.
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  21. Ivaan Shah says:

    Madam Kutub Minar is our national pride from centuries. Last time when i visited that site. I found that it is not straight. It has some tilt. I think its base has some problem govt should take care of it.

    Ivaan

  22. Kawsar Ahmad says:

    Hi,
    Indeed Qutub Minar is the most iconic structure in Delhi and a must visit for anybody coming to Delhi. I was there recently and it is really awesome to look in person. hen I was in Delhi, I went there but I didn’t go inside. Too bad.

    Thanks

  23. Its really great information about Qutub Minar and its very useful to visitor.

  24. Thanks Shalu Sharma, i Have Come First Time in Delhi to Visit Some Historical Places. Qutab Minar is an Outstanding Historical Place in Delhi Where many People Come with Their Families to enjoy holiday and also Huge number of foreigner are here to Visit Qutab Minar.

  25. sara kapoor says:

    I like historical places. Last time i visited the Qutub Minar its awesome place.thanks for sharing this article.it is knowledgeable things.

  26. salek ahmed says:

    Such a great place. I will be coming to visit this awesome place as soon as possible. Thanks for share details

  27. Qutub Minar is a very nice and historical place. this is our national pride. thanks for share this topic.
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